Infrastructure and Transport

Burundi’s transport infrastructure is very limited. Infrastructure plays a major role in the movement of goods and services as well as factor inputs from places of supply to places of demand.

Roads
The country mainly depends on road transport for transportation of good s and services. A crumbling network of 14,480 kilometers of roads, of which 1,028 kilometers are paved. The road network is used by 19,000 passenger cars and 12,300 commercial vehicles.

Rail Network
Burundi does not possess any railway infrastructure, although there are proposals to connect Burundi to its neighbours via railway. Most notably, the East African Railway Master Plan is a proposal for rejuvenating existing railways serving Tanzania, Kenya, Uganda and extending them initially to Rwanda and Burundi and eventually to South Sudan, Ethiopia and beyond.

Airport
The Bujumbura International Airport, which is situated in the capital city of Bujumbura is a the only hub of Airlines flying to and from Burundi

Telecommunication
The country has four fixed telephone lines per 1,000 inhabitants mostly in urban areas. While 90% of the population lives in rural areas and 90% of subscribers are located in urban areas, network coverage in the country is very low. There are six operators, the largest of which is U–Com (formerly known as Télécel), a company that was recently privatized. Other operators include the public operator ONATEL, which offers fixed and mobile telephony services, followed by foreign private operators Africell, Econet, Lacell SU and HITS

As regards to Internet, estimates point to 14,000 users in Burundi, five users per 1,000 inhabitants. Internet service providers include CBINET, USAN Burundi, ONATEL and U–Com.

Energy sector
There is increased demand for Power in Burundi thus Burundi plans to build 50MW dam, the European Investment Bank (EIB) is financing 50% of a 50 Megawatts hydroelectric power dam on Jiji and Murembwe rivers. The project will be executed in partnership with the World Bank and the Burundian Government.

 

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Infrastructure and Transport

Infrastructure plays a major role in the movement of goods and services as well as factor inputs from places of supply to places of demand. Therefore the absence of adequate infrastructure facilities including roads, airports, railway lines, water transport among others greatly constrain production of goods and services in many sectors of the economy. The current situation in the infrastructure and transport sectors  is summarised as follows:

Roads

Transport Cargo freight Paved /functional
Road Sector 96.4% 4%
Rail network 3.5% 26%

The country mainly depends on road transport for transportation of good s and services. The cost of cargo freight by road is 3 times more than the cost of using rail. There are no functional wagon ferries. Transport costs remain a significant trade barrier, equivalent to effective protection of over 20 per cent and imposes an implicit tax on exports of over 25 per cent (and up to 50 per cent on air freight). As a result, the cost of doing business in Uganda is high, undermining economic competitiveness

Rail Network
The Rail network is not longer functioning because of lack of maintenance and improvement. A private sector operator, Rift Valley Railways, has already been contracted to rehabilitate the rail network but not so much progress has been achieved.

Airport
The country has only one international airport, Entebbe International Airport and a few domestic airports. The government through the Civil Aviation Authority is the process of looking for funds to modernise both the international and the domestic airport.

Telecommunication
The Communication infrastructure has improved significantly following liberalization of the sector that has attracted substantial private sector investments.

Energy sector
Substantial investment has gone into the energy sector. An additional power dam has been built and installed and a number of private sector players have been attracted into the sector. Of recent power load shedding has greatly reduced. Negotiation are in the process of being concluded for the construction of Karuma Dam.

Uganda has already discovered substantial deposits of oil and gas and the process of putting the necessary infrastructure for commercial exploitation is underway. Uganda is expected to join the club of oil producing countries within the next five years.

About The Author

Related posts

Infrastructure and Transport

Infrastructure plays a major role in the movement of goods and services as well as factor inputs from places of supply to places of demand. Therefore the absence of adequate infrastructure facilities including roads, airports, railway lines, water transport among others greatly constrain production of goods and services in many sectors of the economy. The current situation in the infrastructure and transport sectors  is summarised as follows:

Roads

Transport

Cargo freight

Paved /functional

Road Sector

96.4%

4%

Rail network

3.5%

26%

The country mainly depends on road transport for transportation of good s and services. The cost of cargo freight by road is 3 times more than the cost of using rail. There are no functional wagon ferries. Transport costs remain a significant trade barrier, equivalent to effective protection of over 20 per cent and imposes an implicit tax on exports of over 25 per cent (and up to 50 per cent on air freight). As a result, the cost of doing business in Uganda is high, undermining economic competitiveness

Rail Network
The Rail network is not longer functioning because of lack of maintenance and improvement. A private sector operator, Rift Valley Railways, has already been contracted to rehabilitate the rail network but not so much progress has been achieved.

Airport
The country has only one international airport, Entebbe International Airport and a few domestic airports. The government through the Civil Aviation Authority is the process of looking for funds to modernise both the international and the domestic airport.

Telecommunication
The Communication infrastructure has improved significantly following liberalization of the sector that has attracted substantial private sector investments.

Energy sector
Substantial investment has gone into the energy sector. An additional power dam has been built and installed and a number of private sector players have been attracted into the sector. Of recent power load shedding has greatly reduced. Negotiation are in the process of being concluded for the construction of Karuma Dam.

Uganda has already discovered substantial deposits of oil and gas and the process of putting the necessary infrastructure for commercial exploitation is underway. Uganda is expected to join the club of oil producing countries within the next five years.

 

About The Author

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